How to Apply Avocado Oil for Face Moisturization


Avocado Oil FaceLooking around your local cosmetic store or supermarket, there is a wide variety of different face moisturizers. All of them usually promising deeply hydrated, younger looking skin (often at a significant price).

But look a little closer at the ingredients list and the petrochemical derived additives like propylene glycol, cyclomethicone, petrolatum and methyl paraben may not sound so appealing.

What if there was a natural oil moisturizer for your face that many people, myself included, are having more far more effective results with than the chemical-laden, brand name moisturizers? What if this very same moisturizer was also about the best cooking oil you could use in your kitchen, made an extremely healthy salad dressing and even an exceptional hair treatment?

Sounds too good to be true, but cold pressed avocado oil is all of these things. This page will look at how to apply avocado oil for face moisturization. Not only is it extremely good at hydrating and softening your skin, online skin forums are also reporting that it is an effective treatment for acne and blackheads, psoriasis and eczema, and even useful for diminishing age spots and mild facial scaring.

Of course it’s important to remember that individual results usually vary greatly depending on your skin type and other factors like nutrition. That said, if your skin is at all sensitive or problematic, it’s got to be beneficial to have one simple, natural oil to use as a face moisturizer, rather than trying to work out which of two dozen different additives might be causing your skin problems.

In the worse case, if using avocado oil on your face doesn’t work as well for you as it has for others, you’ve still got it for cooking, as a salad dressing or for hair treatment.

Personally, since using this cold pressed avocado oil as a moisturizer, in the way I’ll describe ahead, I’ve noticed significant improvements. The skin on my face appears much softer, with a real lessening of the lines on my forehead.

Initially I was worried that using it on my face would make it appear greasy, but after it has been absorbed, it’s actually the opposite. It seems my skin is so well hydrated after using avocado oil that it doesn’t need to produce the excess oil that it used to.

Perhaps even more significantly, the pores on my nose and upper cheeks appear visibly reduced and an occasional slight facial redness also appears lessened. My skin wasn’t terrible before by any means (aren’t we always our own worse critics). Avocado oil just seems to have made it much better. The previous page on cold pressed avocado oil skin benefits has the reasons why it is so effective.

Cold Pressed Avocado Oil for Face Moisturization

How to Apply Avocado Oil You can apply avocado oil to your face in the same way you would any other moisturizer – with a cotton wool pad or very clean fingers. Make sure your face is washed well and preferably still damp to spread the oil easily.

I use it straight after showering or washing my face in the evening. You don’t need that much, perhaps a small dab on each cheek and on the forehead. Avocado oil is very concentrated monounsaturated fatty acids, phytosterols, vitamin E and other antioxidants. A little goes a long way.

While it is not absorbed as quickly as some moisturizers, it is usually barely noticeable in ten to fifteen minutes. If this bothers you, give it a few minutes to be absorbed, then gently wipe your face with a damp washcloth.

You could use it as a day moisturizer (and I often do on days off when I’m not rushing out the door to work), but because it’s so rich, it seems better as a nightly facial moisturizer applied before bed.

Some people recommend mixing half cold pressed avocado oil and half sweet almond oil, which is also very beneficial for the skin. Almond oil takes longer to absorb though, so you may want to keep this as an evening moisturizer and use a damp washcloth on your face before your head hits the pillow. I’d be interested to hear from anyone who has tried this or any other avocado oil combinations as a face moisturizer.

It is important to look for cold pressed avocado oil, and not the cheaper refined oils, if you’re interested in the potential skin restorative properties, rather than just the moisturizing effects. The minimal refinement of cold pressed avocado oil preserves more of the important plant sterols, chlorophyll , vitamin E and other antioxidants.

You can also use it as a salad dressing or other recipe addition to get some good internal skin nutrition. The page on finding avocado oil online has the best options I’ve found.

Avocado oil may also be a useful treatment for skin problems like acne and blackheads and even more serious conditions such as psoriasis and eczema. Also ahead in 3 Ways to Use Avocado Oil for Acne Problems is a special oil cleaning method. This is another great way to moisturize your face with avocado oil at the same time as clearing up many skin problems.

 

Photo 1 credit with thanks: threelayercake / Photo 2 credit with thanks: fiomaha

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5 Responses to “How to Apply Avocado Oil for Face Moisturization”

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  1. ANGELICA says:

    Hola, me puedes decir donde puedo encontrar el aceite fría aceite prensado de aguacate por favor, porque solo encuentro del aceite de aguacate económico, te lo agradecería mucho. GRACIAS

  2. Erica says:

    I use avo oil in my home made sugar scrubs – equal parts sugar and avo oil. Brilliant results. I’m an actress in my late twenties but being short, my career has been made playing children mostly. I maintain my skin with avo oil and am frequently mistaken for eighteen. I’ve always looked young, but I was starting to get fine lines and freaking out a little as looking older right now would kill my career (more so than most actresses). Avocado oil has made a huge difference.

    I also cook with it, equal parts avo and coconut instead of olive oil, and the taste is sooooo much better.

    And I massage it into my scalp once or twice a week, the night before I wash (with apple cider vinegar and bicarb, not shampoo) and I found my scalp produces less oil because of it and I can last longer between washes.

    • Jim says:

      Hi Erica. It sounds like we both use avocado oil for similar things. I also use it with the oil cleaning method for my skin, as a hair treatment and to cook with as it has a much higher smoking point than olive oil. It looks like it’s working well for you too.

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